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What is autism? Symptoms and causes

Explanation of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) 

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects social communication and behaviour. It is referred to as a "spectrum" because it affects individuals differently, ranging from mild to severe symptoms. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is usually diagnosed in childhood, but some people may not receive a diagnosis until later in life.

ASD affects communication skills, including the ability to express oneself verbally and non-verbally, and difficulty understanding social cues and nuances. Children with autism may have difficulty making friends or engaging in social interactions and may have difficulty with imaginative play or understanding abstract concepts.

Behavioral symptoms of autism may include repetitive movements, rigid routines, and a tendency to focus intensely on specific interests or topics. People with autism may also display sensory sensitivities, such as aversion to certain textures, sounds or smells.

Autism is a lifelong condition, but early intervention can help children with autism develop important skills and improve their quality of life.

Treatment options may include behavioural therapy, medication and support services to address communication and social difficulties.

Prevalence of autism

autism Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a relatively common developmental disorder, with an estimated prevalence of about 1 in 54 children in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by 2021. The prevalence of autism has increased in recent decades, but this is believed to be due in part to increased awareness and better diagnosis.

Autism affects people of all genders, races and ethnicities, but it is diagnosed more often in boys than girls. It is also more prevalent in people with certain medical or genetic conditions, such as fragile X syndrome or tuberous sclerosis.

Autism is a global health problem and is recognised as a major public health issue in many countries around the world. It is important to continue research efforts to better understand the causes and treatment options for the child with autism. In addition, increasing awareness and resources for people with autism and their families can help improve their quality of life and promote inclusion and acceptance in society.

Developmental disorders and autism

Developmental disorders are a group of conditions that affect a person's development and often become apparent during childhood.
These disorders can affect many areas of development, such as cognition, communication, socialisation and behaviour.

Some common developmental disorders include:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent deficits in social communication and interaction and by restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior or interests.
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity that interfere with daily functioning.
  • Specific Learning Disorder (SLD): SLD is a disorder that affects a person's ability to acquire and use academic skills such as reading, writing or mathematics.
  • Intellectual Disability: Intellectual Disability: is a condition characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior that affect an individual's ability to perform daily tasks and live independently.
  • Communication disorders: Communication disorders are a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to communicate effectively, such as stuttering, language impairment, and social communication disorder.

Developmental disorders are often diagnosed based on a combination of behavioral observations, medical history, and standardized assessments.

Importance of understanding the symptoms and causes

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Understanding the symptoms and causes of autism is important for several reasons:

Early identification and intervention:

Identifying autism early in a child's life can help parents and caregivers access appropriate support and services to improve the child's outcomes. Early intervention can help children develop important skills, such as communication and socialisation, and reduce the likelihood of later difficulties.

Treatment options:

Understanding the causes of autism can inform the development of new treatment options and help tailor existing treatments to the specific needs of individuals with autism. Currently, behavioural therapy and medication are the main treatments for autism, but ongoing research may lead to the development of new treatments.

Support for families and individuals with autism:

Understanding the symptoms and causes of autism can help reduce stigma and increase acceptance of people with autism and their families. It can also help promote understanding among educators, healthcare providers and others who work with people with autism.

Research:

Understanding the causes of autism is vital to ongoing research efforts to improve understanding of the disorder and develop new treatments and interventions. Research into the causes of autism can also provide insights into other neurodevelopmental disorders and their underlying mechanisms.

In summary, understanding the symptoms and causes of autism is crucial to identifying and treating the disorder, supporting people with autism and their families, reducing stigma, and advancing research efforts.

Symptoms of autism

autism

 The symptoms of autism can vary greatly from person to person, but usually affect social communication and behaviour. Here are some common symptoms of autism:

Communication difficulties: people with autism have difficulty using and understanding language. They may have difficulty engaging in conversation, repeating phrases or words, or have difficulty initiating or responding to social interactions.

Social challenges: A child with autism may have difficulty understanding social cues and may have difficulty developing relationships with others. They may have difficulty making eye contact, sharing interests, or engaging in imaginative play.

Repetitive behaviours and routines: People with autism may engage in repetitive movements or behaviors, such as flapping their hands or rocking back and forth. They may also have rigid routines or rituals that they strictly adhere to.

Sensory problems: People with autism may have sensitivity to certain sensory stimuli, such as certain textures, sounds or smells. They may also have difficulty tolerating changes in routine or unfamiliar situations.

It is important to note that while these symptoms are common in people with autism, not all people with autism experience all of these symptoms and the severity of these symptoms can vary significantly from person to person. In addition, some individuals with autism have additional medical or psychiatric conditions, such as seizures or anxiety, that may also affect their symptoms.

Causes of autism

The causes of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are complex and not fully understood. Research suggests that autism is most likely caused by a combination of genetic, environmental and neurological factors. Here are some possible causes of autism:

Genetic factors: Studies have shown that there is a genetic component to autism. It is believed that multiple genes may be involved in the development of autism, and some of these genes may be inherited from parents. However, no single gene has been identified as a definitive cause of autism.

Environmental factors: Environmental factors may also contribute to the development of autism. Some studies have suggested that exposure to certain toxins or chemicals during pregnancy, such as air pollution or pesticides, may increase the risk of developing autism. Other environmental factors, such as complications during pregnancy or childbirth, may also play a role.

Neurological factors: Neurological factors may also contribute to the development of autism. Brain imaging studies have shown differences in brain structure and activity in children with autism compared to those without autism. These differences may affect how people with autism process information and interact with others.

It is important to note that autism is a complex disorder and the causes can vary greatly from person to person. Furthermore, while research has identified some possible causes of autism, more research is needed to fully understand the underlying mechanisms of the disorder.

Genetic factors

autism Genetic factors play a role in the development of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Although no gene has been identified as a definitive cause of autism, there are several genetic factors that have been associated with the disorder.

Inheritance: Studies have shown that autism has a high rate of inheritance, meaning that it is likely to be passed on from parents to their children. Studies of twins have shown that identical twins, who share 100% of their genes, are both more likely to have autism compared to fraternal twins, who share only 50% of their genes.

Common genetic mutations: Certain genetic mutations have been associated with an increased risk of ASD. For example, mutations in the SHANK3 gene have been linked to a rare genetic disorder called Phelan-McDermid syndrome, which is characterised by cognitive impairment and ADHD. Other common genetic mutations, such as those in the CHD8 gene, have also been associated with an increased risk of ASD.

Copy number variants: Copy number variants (CNVs) are genetic changes involving the deletion or duplication of large segments of DNA. Some CNVs have been associated with an increased risk of autism, and studies have shown that people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are more likely to have CNVs than people without ASD.

While genetic factors are an important component of autism, it is important to note that not all cases of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are due to genetic factors alone. Environmental and neurological factors may also contribute to the development of the disorder. In addition, genetic factors do not guarantee the development of autism and not all individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have a family history of the disorder.

Environmental factors

Environmental factors may contribute to the development of autism Although the exact environmental contributing factors are not fully understood, research has identified several potential factors that may play a role:

Prenatal influences: Research has suggested that factors such as maternal infections, stress and nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy may increase the risk of autism. Exposure to certain toxins, such as mercury and lead, during pregnancy may also increase the risk of ASD.

Complications at birth: Complications during delivery, such as fetal distress, meconium aspiration and low Apgar scores, have been associated with an increased risk of ASD.

Toxin exposure: Exposure to environmental toxins, such as air pollution and pesticides, has been associated with an increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In addition, exposure to certain medications during pregnancy, such as valproic acid, has been associated with an increased risk of ASD.

It is important to note that while environmental factors may contribute to the development of autism, they are likely not the sole cause of the disorder. Genetic and neurological factors also play a role in the development of autism, and the interactions between genetic, environmental and neurological factors are complex and not fully understood. In addition, not all individuals exposed to environmental factors develop ASD and not all individuals with developmental disabilities have been exposed to environmental factors.

Neurological factors

autism Neurological factors are thought to contribute to the development of autism. Studies have shown that people with ASD show differences in brain structure and activity compared to people without autism. Here are some possible neurological factors that may contribute to the development of autism:

Brain development: Research has suggested that differences in brain development may contribute to the development of autism. Studies have shown that individuals with autism may have larger brains, altered developmental patterns, and abnormal connections between brain regions.

Abnormalities in brain structure: Studies have shown that people with ASD may have structural abnormalities in certain areas of the brain, such as the amygdala and cerebellum. These abnormalities may affect social communication and behaviour.

Differences in brain activity and connectivity: Studies have shown that people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have differences in brain activity and connectivity compared to people without autism. For example, some studies have suggested that individuals with ASD may have reduced activity in brain regions involved in social cognition and communication.

While neurological factors likely contribute to the development of autism, it is important to note that the interactions between neurological, genetic and environmental factors are complex and not fully understood. Furthermore, not all individuals with a developmental disorder have the same neurological differences and the severity of these differences can vary significantly from person to person.

Diagnosis of autism

A diagnosis of autism involves a comprehensive assessment of the person's symptoms and behaviours. Although there is no single test for autism, a diagnosis of autism usually involves the following steps:

Developmental screening:

Healthcare providers can use developmental screening tools to detect early signs of ASD in young children. These tools assess a child's development in areas such as language, social interaction, and behavior.

Global assessment:

If developmental screening indicates a potential issue with ADHD, a comprehensive assessment may be recommended. This evaluation may include assessments by a team of specialists, such as a pediatrician, psychologist, and speech and language therapist. The assessment may include interviews with the individual and caregivers, observations of the individual's behavior and interactions, and standardized assessments of cognitive and developmental abilities.

Diagnostic Criteria:

To be diagnosed with ASD, an individual must meet the diagnostic criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). These criteria include persistent deficits in social communication and interaction and restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior or interests.

It is important to note that autism is a spectrum disorder and the severity of symptoms can vary significantly from person to person. In addition, some individuals with ASD may have additional medical or psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which may require additional assessment and treatment. Early diagnosis of autism can help people with ASD develop important skills and improve their quality of life.

Treatment

autism Treatment of autism usually involves a combination of behavioural therapy, medication and support services. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual needs of each person with ASD and may be adjusted over time as their symptoms and needs change. Here are some common treatment options for ADHD:

Behavioral therapy: Behavioral therapy, such as applied behavior analysis (ABA) or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), can help people with ADHD develop important skills such as communication, socialization, and self-care. ABA therapy involves breaking skills down into small, manageable steps and providing positive reinforcement for successful completion. CBT can help people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) manage anxiety, depression and other mental health issues.

Medication: Although there are no medications that can cure ADHD, medications can be used to treat specific symptoms or co-occurring conditions, such as anxiety or hyperactivity. Medications should be used under the guidance of a health care provider, and potential side effects and risks should be carefully monitored.

Support services: Support services, such as speech therapy, occupational therapy, and social skills training, can help people with autism develop important skills and improve their quality of life. Supportive services may also include assistive technology, such as communication devices or sensory tools.

Training for parents and caregivers: Parents and caregivers play a critical role in autism treatment. Training and education can help parents and caregivers better understand their child's needs and develop strategies to support their child's development.

In addition to these treatment options, it is important for people with autism to have access to supportive environments and communities. Schools, workplaces and community organizations can play a role in promoting inclusion and acceptance of people with autism. Early diagnosis and intervention can help people with ASD develop important skills and improve their quality of life.

Autism and early intervention

Early intervention is a critical component of the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Research has shown that early diagnosis and intervention can lead to significantly improved outcomes for individuals with autism.

Early intervention can include a range of services and treatments, such as applied behavior analysis (ABA), speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, and social skills training. The specific interventions used depend on the individual needs of each person with autism.

Some potential benefits of early intervention for ASD include:

Improved social communication and interaction: early intervention can help individuals with autism develop important social skills such as communication, socialization, and empathy.

Improved cognitive and developmental skills: Early intervention can help individuals with autism develop important cognitive and developmental skills, such as problem solving, decision making, and self-care.

Reduced need for specialised services: Early intervention can help individuals with autism develop important skills that may reduce the need for specialized services or supports later in life.

Better long-term outcomes: Studies have shown that early intervention can lead to better long-term outcomes for individuals with a developmental disorder, including improved academic performance, employment outcomes, and quality of life.

It is important to note that early intervention is not a cure for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and the severity of symptoms can vary significantly from person to person. However, early diagnosis and intervention can help people with autism develop important skills and improve their quality of life.

Autism and social skills

Social skills are a common area of difficulty for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Many people with ASD struggle with social communication and interaction, which can affect their ability to form relationships, make friends and navigate social situations.

Some specific social skills deficits that may be present in individuals with autism include:

Difficulty with non-verbal communication: Many individuals with autism have difficulty with nonverbal communication, such as making eye contact, interpreting facial expressions and body language, and using appropriate gestures.

Challenges with social communication: people with autism may have difficulty understanding social cues and social expectations and may have difficulty initiating and maintaining conversations with others.

Limited or repetitive interests: Some people with ASD may have limited or recurring interests, which may make it difficult for them to connect with others who do not share the same interests.

Difficulty with empathy: Individuals with autism may have difficulty understanding or empathizing with the feelings and perspectives of others, which can make it difficult for them to navigate social situations.

Fortunately, there are many interventions and therapies that can help individuals with autism develop social skills and improve their social communication and interaction. Applied behavior analysis (ABA), social skills training, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are all evidence-based interventions that have been shown to be effective in improving social skills in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

In addition, parents and caregivers can play an important role in supporting the social development of individuals with autism. This may include providing opportunities for interaction, modeling appropriate social behavior, and providing praise and positive reinforcement for successful social interactions.

Asperger syndrome and autism

Asperger syndrome and autism are part of the broader category of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but they are separate conditions with some differences in symptoms and characteristics.

Asperger syndrome is an outdated term used to describe children with high-functioning autism who have significant difficulties with social interaction and communication, as well as limited and repetitive behaviors or interests. Individuals with Asperger's syndrome usually have average or above average intelligence and may have a particular area of specialization or interest.

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by persistent deficits in social communication and interaction and by limited and repetitive patterns of behaviour or interests. Autism is a spectrum disorder, meaning that the severity of symptoms can vary considerably from person to person. People with autism can have a range of cognitive abilities, from severe intellectual disability to average or above average intelligence.

In the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the separate diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome was eliminated and all individuals with ASD are now diagnosed with a single umbrella term. However, some individuals and healthcare providers still use the term Asperger syndrome to describe high-functioning autism.

Tips for parents

Here are some tips for parents of children with autism:

Seek early intervention: Early intervention is key for individuals on the autism spectrum. If you suspect your child may have autism, talk to your healthcare provider about developmental screening and early intervention services.

Educate yourself about ASD: Learn about the signs and symptoms of autism, as well as available treatment options and resources. Joining a support group or connecting with other parents of children with autism can also be helpful.

Work with your healthcare provider: Work closely with your healthcare provider to develop a treatment plan that meets your child's specific needs. Be sure to discuss any concerns or questions you may have and advocate for your child's needs.

Create a supportive environment: creating a supportive environment at home and in the community can help your child thrive. This can include creating a structured routine, providing opportunities for sensory input, and seeking out inclusive activities and organizations.

Focus on your child's strengths: While individuals on the autism spectrum may face challenges, it is important to focus on their strengths and interests. Encourage your child to explore their interests and pursue activities that bring them joy and satisfaction.

Take care of yourself: Caring for a child with autism can be challenging and stressful. It is important to take care of yourself as well. Seek support from family and friends and make time for self-care activities such as exercise, hobbies or relaxation techniques.

Remember that every child with autism is unique and there is no one-size-fits-all approach to parenting a child with ASD. However, with early intervention, education and support, people with autism can develop important skills and lead fulfilling lives.

Understanding autism

The level of understanding and awareness of autism has increased significantly in recent decades. In the past, autism was often misunderstood or misdiagnosed and there was limited knowledge about the causes and treatment of the disorder. However, in recent decades, advances in research, education and advocacy have led to greater understanding of autism and better support for individuals.

Public awareness of autism has increased significantly in recent years, in part due to increased media coverage and public education campaigns. Many organisations and advocacy groups, such as Autism Speaks and the Autism Society, have been instrumental in raising awareness of autism and promoting greater understanding and acceptance of individuals.

There has also been significant progress in research into the causes and treatment of autism. Advances in genetics, neuroscience and behavioural therapy have led to greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of autism and improved treatment options for people with autism.

Health professionals

Health professionals can play an important role in helping people with autism by providing accurate diagnosis, effective treatment and support services. Here are some ways in which health professionals can help:

Accurate diagnosis: Health professionals can use standardized assessments and diagnostic criteria to accurately diagnose developmental disorders. Early diagnosis is crucial for early intervention and improved outcomes.

Treatment planning: Health professionals can work with individuals with developmental disorders and their families to develop individualized treatment plans that meet the specific needs of each person. This may include a range of interventions, such as behavioral therapy, medications, and support services.

Progress monitoring: Health professionals can monitor the progress of individuals with developmental disabilities to ensure that treatment is effective and adjusted as needed. Regular assessments can help identify changes in symptoms and areas for improvement.

Support services: Health professionals can help connect individuals with developmental disabilities and their families with support services such as speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, and social skills training. They can also provide education and resources to help families better understand and manage the condition.

Advocacy: Health professionals can advocate for people with developmental disabilities and their families to ensure they receive appropriate services and supports. They can also work to increase awareness and understanding of developmental disorders in the community.

Health professionals can make a significant difference to the lives of people with developmental disorders by providing accurate diagnosis, effective treatment and support services. Collaboration with families, other healthcare providers and community organizations is key to providing comprehensive care and improving outcomes.

Who is eligible to participate in your child's autism care team?

When it comes to caring for a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), creating a care team can be an important step in ensuring that your child receives comprehensive and effective care. Here are some professionals who may be part of your child's care team:

Pediatrician: Your child's pediatrician can provide regular checkups, monitor your child's growth and development, and provide referrals to specialists as needed.

Developmental pediatrician: A developmental pediatrician can provide a comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis of ASD, as well as ongoing monitoring and support.

Psychologist or psychiatrist: A psychologist or psychiatrist can provide behavioural therapy and/or medication for co-occurring conditions such as anxiety or depression.

Speech and language therapist: A speech and language therapist may provide evaluation and treatment for communication difficulties, such as difficulty with speech or language.

Occupational therapist: An occupational therapist can help your child develop important skills related to daily living activities, such as dressing, eating and self-care.

Applied Behavior Analyst (ABA) therapist: An ABA therapist can provide specialized behavioral therapy to help your child develop important social and communication skills.

Special education teacher: A special education teacher can help your child develop important academic and social skills and provide individualized support in the school setting.

Social worker: A social worker can provide support and resources for your family, including connecting you with community resources and support groups.

The specific professionals on your child care team will depend on your child's individual needs. It is important to work closely with your child's health care providers to develop a comprehensive care plan that meets your child's needs and goals. In addition, family members and caregivers can also play an important role in supporting your child's development and well-being.

What is the outlook for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)?

The outlook for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) varies greatly depending on the severity of symptoms and the individual's access to support and resources. However, with early diagnosis and intervention, many individuals with autism can develop important skills and lead fulfilling lives.

The following are some factors that may affect the outlook of individuals with autism:

Early intervention: Early diagnosis and intervention can lead to significantly improved outcomes for individuals with ASD. Research has shown that early intervention can improve social communication and interaction, cognitive and developmental abilities, and reduce the need for specialized services or support later in life.

Treatment and support: Treatment and support services, such as behavioural therapy, speech and language therapy and social skills training, can help people with autism develop important skills and improve their quality of life. Access to appropriate education and employment opportunities is also important for people with ASD.

Co-existing conditions: Many people with autism have co-occurring conditions such as anxiety, depression or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment of these conditions can also affect the overall outlook of people with autism.

Family and community support: Support from family, friends and community organizations can also have a significant impact on the perspectives of individuals with autism. Inclusive and supportive environments can help people with autism feel valued and supported.

Although there is no cure for autism, the outlook of people with the disorder can be improved with early diagnosis, intervention and support. Many individuals with autism have gone on to live successful and fulfilling lives, and continued research and advocacy efforts offer hope for even greater improvements in the future.

Original content from the Upbility writing team. Reproduction of this article, in whole or in part, without credit to the publisher is prohibited.

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